How to select the right speech language pathologist for your adopted child?

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How to select the right speech language pathologist for your adopted child?

You have decided to consult a private speech language pathologist because of concerns over your adopted child’s developing speech and language. But how do you choose the right one? There are many speech therapists out there and not all of them are alike in experience and skills. On top of it all, you are also looking for a bilingual therapist, one who is not only proficient in your child’s native language but is also knowledgeable regarding the speech and language issues of international adoptees. That is not an easy decision to make, especially for many parents who until now have not had any direct contact with a speech language pathologist.
Not to worry, below is a list of simple guidelines designed to assist you in the right therapist selection.

Let’s begin with something basic: educational and professional credentials. A speech language pathologist must possess a Master’s Degree (or its equivalent) from a reputable academic institution of higher learning. They must also have a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech Language Hearing Association as well as an appropriate licensure from the state in which they maintain their practice. Additionally, it is highly recommended that they have Bilingual Certification as it indicates that they have completed the necessary academic coursework and are proficient in the issues surrounding normal and disordered speech-language acquisition of bilingual children in dual languages.

Now we are ready to proceed to experience. Here its gets a little tricky. The traditional approach: “I want the therapist with a gazillion years of experience” is just not going to be all that useful. It can’t be just any experience; it has to be the right experience! After all do you really want a therapist with 30 years of experience in exclusively treating articulation deficits when your child needs help with feeding and swallowing or with developing augmentative/alternative communication?

It is important to choose a therapist who has a rich and varied experience from multiple settings, total years of experience may not be as important as the qualitative value of that experience. A good therapist has probably spent a considerable portion of his/her time in a variety of settings from schools and early intervention agencies to hospitals and rehabilitation clinics. As the result of working in these diverse environments that therapist is much more likely to come up with innovative ideas and solutions to your child’s problems as opposed to just using the same old remediation strategies that they have learned way back then. It is also a good idea to inquire regarding the areas of specialization of the therapist in order to find out whether he/she has successfully treated children with similar problems to your child’s.

Typically, private speech language pathologists who maintain some type of pediatric hospital affiliation (e.g. per diem or part-time employees) are up to date regarding the current methodologies, which they apply to practice on daily basis. The reasons for that are twofold:

Speech departments in hospitals deal with diverse caseloads, with patients ranging in ages, diagnoses (some of which can be quite unusual), and levels of severity. In an average inpatient department staff SLP’s are expected to carry caseloads of 12-16 patients per day.
In order to keep up with the caseload diversity and with the latest treatment trends, hospitals require these SLP’s to actively take professional development courses in order to provide their patients with the best quality of care.
This brings us to another important consideration: professional development. To maintain their state licensure and national certification all therapists are required to take professional education courses in order to stay up to date with all the relevant research and new treatments developed in our field. The minimum requirement is to accumulate 30 professional education hours every 3 years whether by attending courses in person, taking them online through qualified providers, or by conducting workshops and presenting at conferences. Professional development provides the speech therapists with an opportunity to use evidence based techniques supported and tested by research to treat a variety of communication disorders. Consequently, when selecting your therapist it is important to find out just how up to date are they on the current treatment methods and methodologies pertaining to your child speech and language deficits. You can always find out this information by politely questioning the therapist regarding their background and “resume highlights.”

It is also important to find out whether you understand and agree with the therapist’s methods and approaches. For example, if your child is a toddler, it probably does not make sense for him/her to spend most sessions doing worksheets and drills when he/she needs to be engaged in play based, child centered therapy. Don’t be intimidated by the therapist’s credentials and your lack of knowledge, if something they said doesn’t make sense, ask follow up questions and/or look up pertinent information online. While you should not use the internet to diagnose your child’s problems, it can be used as a valuable learning tool to look up information and to share ideas with other parents who experience similar difficulties.

Now that we have specified general selection criteria, let’s talk about how to initiate your search for the right SLP. The best way is again to go online. Start your search by going to the ASHA website and clicking on the ‘Find Professional Button’ located in the top of the page and then follow the instructions on the screen. Fill out your search criteria carefully but don’t be too specific. For example, don’t look for a Russian speaking SLP in Blue Creek, California as you will probably not find one. Instead try typing in the first 3 digits of your zipcode or your state of residence (if it’s small enough) and don’t forget to specify the language of the practitioner. That will get you the optimum results.

Once you have located several candidates, you can narrow down the search by trying to learn something about them online. Google the clinician’s name (or the name of their practice) to see whether they have their own website, have written any articles or have been profiled by any organizations. To make sure that your practitioner’s licensure is up to date, visit your state’s speech language accreditation website and type in the last name of the professional. Typically, a window will pop up listing the therapists’ names alphabetically, find the one you are looking for and check if their license is active. Finally, armed with your research, create a list of questions that you might have for the practitioners and start making phone calls. Find out all the pertinent information and don’t forget to ask about rates which may differ depending on what services the practitioner is providing.

Please note that many private practitioners refuse to deal with insurance companies directly due to the hassle of multiclient billing as well as extended wait for reimbursement. They will instead provide you with a letter for your insurance company, containing the necessary diagnosis and treatment codes, incurred fees as well as a brief description of services provided, and will expect you to apply for reimbursement on your own.

Now that we have gone over the selection process in some detail, please keep in mind that you can always learn more information on this and any other speech pathology related topic by visiting the ASHA website and clicking on the ‘Public’ tab located at the top of the screen.

Best of luck in your search and happy hunting!

Useful websites:
Find a Professional SLP on the ASHA website: http://www.asha.org/proserv/
State Contacts & Licensure Requirements: http://www.asha.org/about/legislation-advocacy/state/

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