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Speech, Language, & Literacy Disorders in School Aged Children with Psychiatric Impairments

Recently I did a presentation for Rutgers University on the subject of  “Speech, Language, & Literacy Disorders in School-Aged Children with Psychiatric Impairments“. The learning objectives for this presentation were as follows:  

  • Explain the comorbidity between language impairments and psychiatric disturbances of school-aged children
  • Describe language and literacy deficits of school-aged children with psychiatric impairments
  • List warning signs of language and literacy deficits in school-aged children that warrant a referral to speech-language pathologists for a potential assessment

It focused on the fact that health professionals need to be aware of a significant comorbidity between psychiatric impairments and language disorders, in order to appropriately refer relevant children for potential assessment and treatment services to improve their social and academic outcomes.

This presentation was video recorded and can be accessed in its entirety below as we as on Youtube. You can also access the handouts which accompany the video HERE

References:

  • Angus, L. E., & McLeod, J. (Eds.) (2004). The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy. London, UK: Sage Publications
  • Aram, D.M., Ekelman, B.E., & Nation, J.E. (1984). Preschoolers with language disorders: 10 years later. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 27, 232-244.
  • Baltaxe,  C.  A. M., & Simmons,  J.  Q. (1988b).  Pragmatic deficits in  emotionally  disturbed  children  and  adolescents.  In  R. Schiefelbusch & L. Lloyd  (Eds.), Language perspectives (2nd ed.,  pp. 223-253).  Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
  • Baker,  L.,  & Cantwell,  D. P. (1987b).  A prospective psychiatric  follow-up  of children  with  speech/language  disorders. Journal of the American Academy  of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 26, 546-553.
  • Beitchman, J., Cohen, N., Konstantareas, M., & Tannock, R. (Eds.) (1996). Language, learning and behaviour disorders: Developmental, biological and clinical perspectives. Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Benner, G.J., Nelson, R., & Epstein, M.H. (2002). Language skills of children with EBD: a literature review-emotional and behavioral disorders- statistical data included. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 10, 43-59.
  • Bishop, D. V., & Baird, G. (2001). Parent and teacher report of pragmatic aspects of communication: Use of the Children’s Communication Checklist in a clinical setting. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 43(12), 809–818.
  • Brosnan, M.J. et al. (2004) Gestalt processing in autism: failure to process perceptual relationships and the implications for contextual understanding. The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 459–469
  • Bryan, T. (1991). Social problems and learning disabilities. In B. Y. L. Wong (Ed.), Learning about learning disabilities (pp. 195-229). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
  • Cohen, N. & Barwick, M. (1996) Comorbidity of Language and Social-Emotional Disorders: Comparison of Psychiatric Outpatients and Their Siblings. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 25(2), 192-200.
  • Cohen, N., Barwick, M., Horodezky, N., Vallance, D., & Im, N. (1998). Language, achievement, and cognitive processing in psychiatrically disturbed children with previously identified and unsuspected language impairments. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 39, 865–877.
  • Cohen, N., & Horodezky, N. (1998). Prevalence of language impairments in psychiatrically referred children at different ages: Preschool to adolescence [Letter to the editor]. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 35, 461–262.
  • Emde, R., Wolf, D., & Oppenheim, D. (Eds.) (2003). Revealing the inner worlds of young children—The MacArthur story stem battery. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • —Gallagher, T. M. (1999). Interrelationships  among children’s language, behavior,  and emotional problems. Topics in  Language Disorders, 19, 1–15.
  • Gardner, R. (1993). Storytelling in psychotherapy with children. London, UK: Jason Aronson.
  • —Gilmour J, et al (2004). Social communication deficits in conduct disorder: a clinical and community study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry45: 967– 78.
  • Goldman, L. G. (1987). Social implications of learning disorders. Reading, Writing and Learning Disabilities, 3, 119-130.
  • —Gurney, D., Gersten, R., Dimino, J. & Carnine, D. (1990). Story grammar: Effective literature instruction for high school students with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 23, 335-348.
  • Happé, F. G. E. (1994). An Advanced Test of Theory of Mind: Understanding of Story Characters’ Thoughts and Feelings by Able Autistic, Mentally Handicapped and Normal Children and Adults. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 24, 129-154.
  • Hill, J. W., & Coufal, K. L. (2005). Emotional/behavioral disorders: A retrospective examination of social skills, linguistics, and student outcomes. Communication Disorders Quarterly27(1), 33–46.
  • Hollo, A., Wehby, J. H., & Oliver, R. O.  (2014). Unsuspected language deficits in children with emotional and behavioral disorders: A meta-analysis. Exceptional Children, Vol. 80, No. 2, pp. 169-186.
  • Hummel, L. J., & Prizant, B. M. (1993) A socioemotional perspective for understanding social difficulties of school-age children with language disorders. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 24, 216–224
  • Hyter, Y. D. (2003). Language intervention  for children with emotional or behavioral disorders. Behavioral  Disorders, 29, 65–76.
  • —Hyter, Y. D., et al (2001). Pragmatic language intervention for children with language and emotional/behavioral disorders. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 23(1), 4–16.—
  • Langton,S et al, (2000) Do the eyes have it? Cues to the direction of social attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4 (2) 50-59.
  • Losh, M., & Capps, L. (2003). Narrative ability in high-functioning children with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 33, 239–251.
  • Nelson, J. R., Benner, G. J., & Cheney, D. (2005).An investigation of the language skills of students with emotional disturbance served in public school settings. Journal of Special Education39, 97–105.
  • Pearce, P. et al. (2014). Use of narratives to assess language disorders in an inpatient pediatric psychiatric population. Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry, 19(2) 244-259.—
  • Prizant, B.M., et al. (1990). Communication disorders and emotional/behavioral disorders in children and adolescents. The Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 55, 179-192.
  • —Semrud-Clikeman, M., & Glass, K. (2010).  The Relation of Humor and Child Development: Social, Adaptive, and Emotional Aspects.  Journal of Child Neurology, 25, 1248-1260.
  • Sanger, D., Maag, J. W., & Shapera, N. R. (1994). Language problems among students with emotional and behavioral disorders. Intervention in School and Clinic30(2), 103–108.
  • —Tallal, P., Dukette, D,. and Curtiss, S (1989) Behavioral Emotional Profiles of Preschool language impaired children. Development and Psychopathology (1) 51-67.
  • Toppelberg, C., & Shapiro, T. (2000). Language disorders: A 10-year research update review. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39, 143–152.
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Professional Development Hours

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Smart Speech Therapy LLC is excited to present its new professional development service. Now we offer Continuing Maintenance Hours (CMHs) on select purchased text-based products.  These hours fulfill the requirement set forth by the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) for certification maintenance.

Here’s how it works.  Select products from the Smart Speech Therapy LLC online store are eligible for professional development hours.  These products are identified in the online store ONLY under the heading: CMH Quiz.

Customers purchasing particular products from our store can also purchase a text-based quiz for an additional fee. Upon completing a  quiz and attaining 80% accuracy on it, customers will receive a certificate of course completion worth a specific amount of hours (ranging from 1 CMH- 6 CMHs depending on the length of the product).

Each quiz description states the number and type of test questions (typically a combination of multiple choice as well as essay questions) as well as how many continuing maintenance hours the course is eligible for.

All customers who have purchased qualifying products in the past calendar year are eligible for this professional development opportunity upon a provision of proof of purchase after the purchase of the quiz.  Customers who have purchased their products more than a year ago can reach out to us to inquire regarding their eligibility, which would be established for them for a small surcharge to cover the course processing fee.

So get your continuing maintenance hours today!