IA

Speech Language Assessment of Older Internationally Adopted Children

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(1 customer review)

$22.99

This 65 slide presentation explains how to assess speech language abilities of older Internationally Adopted Children

Overview

—Institutionalization affects every child’s speech-language development. Signs of delay can be obvious or obscure; show immediately or years later. This presentation will review the latest literature regarding the language abilities of post-institutionalized children adopted at older ages. It will discuss language development of older children post-adoption, explain the difference between conversational and cognitive language competencies, offer pre-adoption recommendations, address select pre-assessment preparations as well as to provide recommendations on best assessment practices for these children.
Learner outcomes:
  • —Review the latest literature regarding the language abilities of post-institutionalized children adopted at older ages (over 3 years of age)
  • —Discuss language development of older children post-adoption
  • —Explain the difference between conversational and cognitive language competencies
  • —Outline pre-adoption recommendations and their importance
  • —Address select pre-assessment preparations
  • —Provide recommendations on best assessment practices for IA children

Slide Content:

  • Introduction
  • Statistics
  • Concerns regarding older adoptees
  • Language Development of older IA children post-adoption
  • Models of Second Language Acquisition
  • Birth Language Attrition
  • L2 Acquisition
  • Communicative vs. Cognitive Language Gains
  • What is Academic Language?
  • Academic Language Functions
  • The difference between CLF/CLM and BICS/CALP
  • Older IA children and Language Gains
  • Pre-adoption Recommendations
  • Documentation of birth language speech delays
    • When it’s not in the records
  • Post-Adoption Assessment Preparation
  • Records Review and Risk Factors Assessment
  • A Note on Alcohol-Related Deficits
    • Maternal Risk Factors
    • Asking the right questions re: FASD related risk factors
  • Understanding the risks
  • Determining Presence of Birth-Language Delay (without documentation)
  • Assessment Recommendations
  • Initial Assessment Recommendations: Newly Adopted Older Child
  • Assessing IA child one year post arrival
  • Eliciting Language Samples
  • Dynamic Assessment
  • Putting it all together
  • Assessing Older Child Several Years Post Adoption
  • Determining Severity
  • Follow-Up Monitoring of Possible Problem Areas
  • Focus on Behavior
  • Conclusion
  • Helpful Resources
  • References
  • Contact Information

You can find a comprehensive review of it by Kelly of Speech2u Blog HERE.

1 review for Speech Language Assessment of Older Internationally Adopted Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    This is a well-developed presentation of an area that is being seen at an ever increasing rate. The language development and needs of children of international adoption is unique, and requires specialized considerations during assessment.

    The areas discussed include: a review of the literature on the language abilities of post-institutionalized children; language development; pre-assessment recommendations; best-practices in assessment.

    Notes of particular interest:

    — Rapid birth language attrition occurs post arrival long before the acquisition of second language is complete
    — IA children are not bilingual since they are not adopted by parents who speak their birth language; ESL classes are not applicable to them
    — In less than one year, many IA children display impressive language gains
    — Many older post-institutionalized children struggle for years without any interventions falling further and further behind peers due to undetected foundational gaps in knowledge of the birth language as well as other risk factors
    — Assessment considerations: Due to rapid birth language attrition, an evaluation in birth language will not be valid after +/- 4 months in the receiving country; even less for children with delayed and disordered speech-language abilities; the window of opportunity for birth language assessment for language impaired children is very narrow and is typically measured in weeks vs. months; after several months child should be evaluated in L2 in order to determine how rapidly s/he is acquiring it; history of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Pre-assessment checklists are provided for preschool and school-aged children and a very extensive references section are provided.

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